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#1 2009-04-01 13:57:02

StranSongs
Senior Member
From: Belfast
Registered: 2009-03-31
Posts: 330
Website

Live recording at home.

Wondered what was the best way of capturing a "live " sound when recording at home.

Is it best to mic an amp that has two channels ( vocals and guitar)? Or can you mic both guitar and vocals and squeeze both into the computer at the same time?


"Don't play what's there, play what's not there." Miles Davis

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#2 2009-04-01 15:43:17

geoaguiar
Honoured Member
Registered: 2007-03-24
Posts: 1108

Re: Live recording at home.

I use a Tascam 144 USB interface to do just that. Check out Russell Hardings recording forum for lots of useful info on software and hardware. There's a wealth of info and Russell does a stellar job


I used to be disgusted; now I try to be amused.
Elvis Costello

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#3 2009-04-01 16:36:09

Russell_Harding
Alien moderator
From: A black hole in deep space
Registered: 2007-10-29
Posts: 6475
Website

Re: Live recording at home.

Welcome Stransongs to chordie if you want to get a recording into your computer you will need recording software to process it to your hard drive as a mp3, wav, etc. there are a few freeware programs like Reaper and Audacity, Audacity is the easiest to learn. If you dont have a recorder then you will need to either mic the amp, or if it has a line out jack run a 1/4 in guitar chord with a 1/8 in female mono adapter to the mic input on the back of your pc and open the software program and see if your getting a signal, do you have recording gear or software? let me know so I can give you my best recomendation. smile


"Growing old is not for sissies"

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#4 2009-04-02 03:49:05

KajiMa
Senior Member
From: Glastonbury
Registered: 2009-03-24
Posts: 607

Re: Live recording at home.

As long as you have two (or more) seperate inputs to your recording device you can record vox and box together.

It can be good as some performers sing and the chords follow.

You always get the chance to go back and "double track" both vox and box seperately if you have a device or software that supports more than stereo/dual track/channel recording.

It breaks down to: - seperate Space you're recording in (and what you can do about it) then input preamps (or not) then routing/distribution possibilities (input/outut configuration/s) (or not) Recorder Inputs/

Wotcha got???

Like to hear, like to help!!!


<-----<< On an even field, only talent prevails! >>----->
   Gans Gwarak da yn dorn yu lel, gwyr lowen an golon!
        >>-----> Rudhes hag Owres, Kajima <-----<<

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#5 2009-04-03 03:52:59

Doug_Smith
Moderator
From: Western Oregon,US
Registered: 2008-07-22
Posts: 1128

Re: Live recording at home.

Hey StrandSongs and welcome aboard!

  Do take a look at the Audacity and Reaper programs if you get a chance.  Both will support multiple track recording and do a nice job of mixing with a huge selection of effects to choose from.  I think most of us do track on track recording, laying down each track as an individual.  ie: Bass line, percussion, guitar 1, guitar 2, keyboards, vocal lead 1, backup vocals, etc.  You can then edit each individual track and "tweak" it to your liking while monitoring the full mix until you get the sound you are reaching for, then do the final master mix as stereo, adjust your pan and export the final as an MP3 to file, burn, or whatever.  Audacity will handle something like 74 tracks, although your PC tends to bog a bit if you are short of RAM.  Eight tracks seems to be optimal at least for me, but your mileage may vary.

Take Care;
Doug


"what is this quintessence of dust?"  - Shakespeare

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#6 2009-05-22 04:08:50

isaacdbowen
Junior Member
Registered: 2009-05-11
Posts: 2

Re: Live recording at home.

When I record, it is usually only 2-4 pieces and it is for a demo.  Therefore, we just play directly into my Yamaha AW4412 and I mix it down later.  If there is a mistake, it doesn't matter because we're only trying to get a good 30 - 45 seconds of each song.  We play about 10 songs.  This is to get gigs. 

If I were recording to actually cut a track, I would use a computer program and it would take a lot more patience.  Probably laying down the drums and bass first.  Next guitar, then vocals, followed by any other strings, synths, etc.

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#7 2009-05-22 04:55:06

Russell_Harding
Alien moderator
From: A black hole in deep space
Registered: 2007-10-29
Posts: 6475
Website

Re: Live recording at home.

Hi Issac and welcome to Chordie and the recording forum the steps you mention seem like a good program to follow if your playing all the parts yourself but it seems if you have a band you may lose some of the quality by not recording the whole group instead of layering separate tracks,there is a difference with a group the overall sound to me seems better because you feel better when recording because you like the sound and therefor you will play a little more inspired but you would need more microphones and unless you can get or have them you will have to do it the way you mentioned smile

isaacdbowen wrote:

If I were recording to actually cut a track, I would use a computer program and it would take a lot more patience.  Probably laying down the drums and bass first.  Next guitar, then vocals, followed by any other strings, synths, etc.


"Growing old is not for sissies"

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