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#1 2013-01-25 12:53:06

Just Tel
Member
From: Inland Waterways of England
Registered: 2010-04-30
Posts: 33

String Bending

I have two electric guitars which I am picking up more regularly as I have in the past been more of an acoustic player and always gig with an electro acoustic. My problem is that when playing chords on the electrics, I unintentionally keep bending the third G string out of tune which makes some chords sound rubbish (D and A). I always use 11's on acoustic and electric guitars so I can't see that it is a gauge issue. I intend to fit a new string set with a wound third to see if that helps me but has anyone any advice on how I might stop doing it. I try not too but it's probably a habit that I have gained over the years without realising.
I am an old git who has been playing for 50 years on and off so I guess it's going to be difficult for me  to change but all suggestions are welcome.


Tel

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#2 2013-01-25 15:14:12

Tenement Funster
Senior Member
From: Nova Scotia, Canada
Registered: 2013-01-20
Posts: 479

Re: String Bending

Hello, Tel ...

I've also been playing a while (about 45 yrs) and am primarily an acoustic player also. What you describe is my same experience, so I suppose it's some consolation to find someone else having the same aggravation. When I pick up the electric, I find myself doing exactly as you describe. I've checked the intonation with a tuner, and everything's fine on my four guitars.

I think it's because acoustic strings are typically heavier than electrics, so we've simply become accustomed to using a firmer grip. For example, a set of "light" acoustic strings typically ranges from .012 >>> .053, whereas a "light" electric set would go .010 >>> .046. Acoustics generally have a bit higher action also, so we habitually squeeze harder for a bit more sustain ... could be another contributing factor. Perhaps in a few more years, the the onset of age-related arthritis will intervene, and our troubles will be solved (hahaha).

Last edited by Tenement Funster (2013-01-25 15:17:43)


ACOUSTICS:  LaPatrie "Concert" / Larrivee D-03
ELECTRIC:  EP Les Paul Custom Pro w/ Stetsbar Pro II trem
BASS:  Cort GB34A
AMPS:  Peavey VK212 / Fender Rumble 150

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#3 2013-01-25 15:37:08

Baldguitardude
El Modarino
From: Las Vegas
Registered: 2010-12-09
Posts: 1162
Website

Re: String Bending

Sounds like you're muscling the thing to death. Less string pressure should help.

The other option is that your intonation is off...have you checked that?

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#4 2013-01-25 15:38:33

Just Tel
Member
From: Inland Waterways of England
Registered: 2010-04-30
Posts: 33

Re: String Bending

Hi Tenement Funster  and thanks for your contribution. I think that I can now see what I'm doing wrong which is to push the string to the side rather than downwards. However trying to correct my doing it the "wrong" way for all these years is not going to be so easy but maybe with more concentration I may improve it.
Like your comment though re age-related arthritis.


Tel

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#5 2013-01-25 20:49:12

Phill Williams
THE MODERATE MODERATOR
From: The Land Of Song
Registered: 2007-12-10
Posts: 2391
Website

Re: String Bending

hi JT, i bought my 1st guitar at 14, back in 1965, so over the years i've picked up some bad habits. but one thing i've found is that when you play electric, open chords do seem to sound out of tune. what i do for the A chord is to barre my middle finger over three strings. this might make the open high E buzz a little, but i dont find it matters too much. for D chords i use finger tips, i know some people use the index finger for F# & A notes, but i find they also cause buzzing.

you might find that leaving the G string open whilst playing A chord, adds a different dimension.


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#6 2013-01-25 23:01:56

Baldguitardude
El Modarino
From: Las Vegas
Registered: 2010-12-09
Posts: 1162
Website

Re: String Bending

Oh is it only for open chords? I didn't notice that. Might try swapping out your nut for a bone nut....could be a timbre thing, too.

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#7 2013-01-26 01:25:06

beamer
THE METALIZER
From: Texas
Registered: 2006-07-30
Posts: 1267

Re: String Bending

My two cents,,, use index finger to barr the A. open A stringand press down D n G, dont worry about the high notes. With electric its not that noticeable (to me anyway) On the D chord, its tips and light pressure. or if your playing rock and roll, just mute yout high e and not play it, just use your index and 3rd fingers. ( that is how I do it anyway, I play my electrics a tad more than acoustic.)


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#8 2013-01-26 11:18:34

Just Tel
Member
From: Inland Waterways of England
Registered: 2010-04-30
Posts: 33

Re: String Bending

Thanks for your input and suggestions folks. I will try your suggestions and see if they help. However I spent 4 hours yesterday trying to improve and correct my 50 year old habit and at the end of the  day despite having sore fingers, there was a definite  improvement  to the sound.


Tel

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#9 2013-02-08 16:20:31

ScarletandCream
Junior Member
From: California
Registered: 2013-01-13
Posts: 8

Re: String Bending

A guitar is like a woman,...it response to touch. The lighter the touch the faster you will be, but remember, timing with your picking hand is very important.


I love the blues, and 70's rock, and can dig the new stuff. Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, and Jimmy Page being my top three, I also enjoy Richie Blackmore, Rory Gallagher, and Santana (got my picture with him).

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