Topic: Strumming

When playing rhythm can one strum to the melody of the music (4 quarter notes 4 strums - 2 half notes 2 strums & hold for 2 counts each - full note 1 strum hold for 4 counts), instead of using a set strumming pattern all the way through? I am 74 years old, a beginner and slow learner and don't like to sing much. So to tell what song I am playing it seems strumming to the melody of the music works better. Or is it not right to do it this way? Also when looking at songs in Chordie when I see a chord such as EM or G or whatever above the wording. Do they get 4 strums per chord. Some are closer together so I assume they get only 2 strums? Or do you have to figure this out yourself with the music?
Thank you

Re: Strumming

the thing about playing the guitar or any other instrument is that you do it the way you feel best playing. be inventive, be original. why copy someone else? unless you're accompanying some one that is, then i suppose you have to play the way they'd like it.

as for strumming patterns; you can strum up and down. have a listen to some older eagles songs eg lying eyes and listen to they're strumming patterns.

There are two "L's" in Phill

Re: Strumming

Rule number one of guitar: If it sounds good, it is good.

Play what you want for the style you want.  If you are looking to have the song recognized without you singing it, you're going to have to learn to do some lead picking.  If you don't really care that anyone recognizes it, or can convince someone else to sing it, or you feel like going out on a limb and singing anyway, that all works too. 

I don't play anything like a straight cover.  None of my guitar parts sound like the originals.  Everything gets a new arrangement that I can play.  That said, it's fun to stretch yourself and learn how to do a "proper" sounding lick, especially for key guitar phrases. 

I'm sorry that this is such a wishy-washy answer, but the whole thing is for you to have fun making music.

"If it comes from the heart and you add a few beers... it'll be awesome!" - Mekidsmom

Official recipient of B chord amnesty.

Re: Strumming

Lots of the tabs are approximations of where you need to place chord changes. You kinda have to play with it in order to figure out what sounds right. Like Zurf, I rarely play a song as written...unless it's a teenie bopper pop song, in which case doing so is hilarious.

Way to go on picking up something new at 74. That's wonderful!

Re: Strumming

It's really hard to strum and have something come out as an easily, recognizable song. There are only so many chords and they are used over and over. As was mentioned earlier, adding a few lead licks will help a lot. Stepping through the chords with individual notes can help as well.

Give a listen to this and you'll see what I mean about only working with a limited number of chords. There are 25 +/- songs played in this 4 minute video. They are all using the same 4 chord progression.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QpB_40hYjXU

__________________________________
[b]Today Is Only Yesterdays Tomorrow[/b]

Re: Strumming

Thanks everyone. Got a couple of things I want to try. The lead licks is something I have never looked into. And I see also someone posted strumming pattern video's on the site. Going to look at those as well.

Re: Strumming

Rivercruzin, don't mean for this to sound "outta line" but you are overthinking everything. At 74 years old you ain't going to be getting any groupies or gigs to play out in public. You talk about "quarter notes", "half notes", and "full notes".  That's where I think you are overthings things. Feel the music, listen for the bass notes of the song as it will give you the tempo. Try tapping your finger on a table top to the beat the bass player is playing - that will be your strum pattern. Count in your head the bass beats per measure. It takes time but it's easy. If you like some of the older country music songs I will send you some songs with the strum patterns as well as the chord changes in the proper location abouve the lyrics. All you will need is the cd so you can listen as you play the song.  You may need to change the chords to match your key but that's anouther subject (but an easy one).  Send me an e-mail if you are interested.

Nela

Re: Strumming

I found a website a while back that had a lot of oldies PLUS they showed the strum pattern for the chords.  I have it bookmarked.  Not sure if I can post it to this site, though.

Keeping It Fun, Dean
'91 Epiphone PR350E
'11 Taylor GC3
'15 Taylor GS Mini/Mahogany

Re: Strumming

Newbie Dean wrote:

I found a website a while back that had a lot of oldies PLUS they showed the strum pattern for the chords.  I have it bookmarked.  Not sure if I can post it to this site, though.

The rule is that you aren't permitted to post a link to a site from which you stand to be compensated. If you have a fiduciary or financial interest in the site - don't post without permission from the site owner (administrator@chordie.com). Doing so is unfair to our advertisers.

However, we do permit infrequent posts to sites that people have found useful and they haven't any financial interest, depending on context. 

I hope that helps.

- Zurf (moderator on this forum)

"If it comes from the heart and you add a few beers... it'll be awesome!" - Mekidsmom

Official recipient of B chord amnesty.

Re: Strumming

Wish I could find the web site that Newbie was referring to

Re: Strumming

try this http://www.heartwoodguitar.com/chords/

Re: Strumming

Heartwood is the one I was referring to.  I just wasn't sure it was OK to post web addresses to this forum.  I guess it would have been OK.

Keeping It Fun, Dean
'91 Epiphone PR350E
'11 Taylor GC3
'15 Taylor GS Mini/Mahogany

Re: Strumming

I figured it was better for me to get in trouble than you. smile

Web addresses are fine so long as they aren't SPAM, which is generally defined as irrelevant or site selling stuff that don't buy ads.

BGD