Topic: when things go wrong when you're playing live

I've just got home from playing a gig where I had a couple of technical issues that I hope one of you nice people may be able to help me with.
Towards the end of the set I started to gradually loose volume.  It wasn't a sudden drop off, it was quite subtle at first but became worse over the course of a couple of songs (I thought it was my imagination at first).  I use a wireless pack so the first thing I did was drop that and use a cable instead (as I guessed it could be due to interference).  That didn't help and so eventually, when it became so bad I was hardly audible, I disconnected the effects and ran the guitar straight in to the amp which worked a treat and I played the rest of the night without effects.
The pedal board was going straight in to the front end of a solid state Fender amp (it doesn't have an effects loop).  It seems likely that it was something on the pedal board that was causing the problem but I can't think of anything that would make the sound reduce gradually rather than just cutting out suddenly.  I use eight pedals powered on a daisy chain and have never had this problem before.
Any ideas?

Re: when things go wrong when you're playing live

Power issue where you were playing and the pedals weren't getting enough juice? I always bring batteries in case I'm playing somewhere with bad power

Re: when things go wrong when you're playing live

"Sounds" like there could be a problem with one of your pedals, and something over-heating inside (like a swollen resistor or capacitor will do). Try isolating each one in your chain (guitar > one pedal > amp) and working through them. The culprit should reveal itself if you give each one time to warm up.

Good luck!

ACOUSTICS:  Cordoba D10-CE / LaPatrie "Concert" / Takamine GD30CE-12 / Norman ST30
ELECTRICS:  EP Les Paul Custom Pro / Gretsch Streamliner G2420T
AMPS:  Traynor YCS50 / Tenement Funster VK212 / Traynor AM150T
EFFECTS: Boss ME-80 Multi-effects / Ibanez WD7 wah

4 (edited by Tenement Funster 2017-06-26 22:46:16)

Re: when things go wrong when you're playing live

Shaun ...

Don't know if you're still checking in, but was wondering how you've made out finding the source of your volume drop troubles? Would love to hear how you solved it, as this becomes a great part of the knowledge base here, which all can learn from.

ACOUSTICS:  Cordoba D10-CE / LaPatrie "Concert" / Takamine GD30CE-12 / Norman ST30
ELECTRICS:  EP Les Paul Custom Pro / Gretsch Streamliner G2420T
AMPS:  Traynor YCS50 / Tenement Funster VK212 / Traynor AM150T
EFFECTS: Boss ME-80 Multi-effects / Ibanez WD7 wah

Re: when things go wrong when you're playing live

That is strange  I cannot remember having that problem, usually the effect that is having a problem just won't work and the signal will bypass it without a volume drop unless you have a volume pedal like I do then a bad component could cause failure.

"Growing old is not for sissies"

Re: when things go wrong when you're playing live

When I play in  large place I use two C12VR that are omni directional and in one place I played I used the same mics but their system stopped working after just a few minutes. It turned out to be a blown tube and they had no backup at all. I had a small amp in the car that was in no way adequate for the size but that is all that worked. I guess sometimes part might work when nothing else is available. Hope the problem being discussed is smaller rather than bigger.

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

Re: when things go wrong when you're playing live

hi shaun,

have you checked your connecting leads? if you're using a daisy chain then one or more of the jacks or leads may be damaged. good advice above check everything in order. i'd do it before pulling anything to bits.

let us know how you get on?

There are two "L's" in Phill

Re: when things go wrong when you're playing live

Thanks guys. I've used the same set up twice since and not had a problem. I think it could have been a power issue. When i thought about it a few days later after reading some of your advice I had a powered monitor and an electric fan (it was a hot night) as well as the effects running off a 4 gang extension. I am running a lot of pedals at once. Maybe time to thin them out a bit. Thanks again guys

Re: when things go wrong when you're playing live

Amazing guys keep it up

I hate liars and this guy is one. says he's from Brisbane Australia but his IP is Pakistan, a spammer in the waiting. phill moderator

Re: when things go wrong when you're playing live

shaunm wrote:

Thanks guys. I've used the same set up twice since and not had a problem. I think it could have been a power issue. When i thought about it a few days later after reading some of your advice I had a powered monitor and an electric fan (it was a hot night) as well as the effects running off a 4 gang extension. I am running a lot of pedals at once. Maybe time to thin them out a bit. Thanks again guys


I love my stomps also, but have you thought of going to a multi effects processor?  Ever since I have had my Digitech RP boxes I have rarely had to add any stomps.  If you play live I  suggest either a RP 500 or RP1000. (or a line 6 or a vox, but I know the RP series).  In the states just saw a used RP1000 at Guitar center for like $175 or so. Stupid affordable.  The difference is either a bank of 5 or 10 for channels.

The other advantage, rugged built for giging, one power source needed in your extension( go to a 6 slot gang), you can program ANYTHING lolol, There are toys in there I still have not figured out.   also you can set the presets to your set list.  it really has a lot to offer, and no i am not attached to the company LOLOL

just a suggestion.

OH and BTW i left my A/B Y box plugged in and killed the battery and there is no by pass so i had nothing.  (Note to self, get A/B Y box that is powered.)

Mal - Well, lady, I must say, you're my kinda stupid.
Mal - Jayne, your mouth is talking. You might wanna look to that
Kaylee - No power in the verse can stop me. BOOK-  you're going to burn in a very special level of hell. A level they reserve for child molesters and people who talk at the theatre.

Re: when things go wrong when you're playing live

hello Beamer.

We're you playing live when the A/B Y box died?  There's nothing like the sinking feeling you get when you strum a chord and no sound comes out in front of a bunch of people

I used a Boss ME-50 for years which was great. Like you said, nice and rugged, one power input (or even 6 aa batteries).  I noticed I wasn't using that much on it though as I'd got myself a nice tube amp and used the drive and reverb on that instead to save me lugging it around to practice and gigs.  So I decided to just use a wah pedal (which I already had).  Then I realised I needed a tuner (of course) so I got one of those.  Then I missed the delay so I bought one of those too (you see where I'm going with this). Before I knew it I had a pedal board that takes up more room than the multi effects I'd stopped using to save room.  They are so addictive once you start buying them. 

I'm in a covers band so I need a wide range of sounds.  The individual pedals do sound better than the multi effects to my ear (but I'm certainly no expert) but I do think that it might be time to give the ME-50 another go or maybe trade in some stuff for a Digitech like yours.  A friend of mine uses one and loves it.

Re: when things go wrong when you're playing live

hi shaunm,

i have a digitech RP-55 which i use for recording, it's got lots of nice sounds but a royal pain to get them up as it's got two pedals; one for up one for down. i use an ME-50 for stage work, i do covers but want to put my own stamp on the songs so i don't care if it's not exactly as record. i've had Boss multi's before and there seems to be a weakness in the power adaptor, it's cheaper to buy new than have them repaired and they do last for years.

There are two "L's" in Phill

Re: when things go wrong when you're playing live

hello phill.

When I used  to use the ME-50 live I almost always used batteries rather than an adaptor mainly because it saved on stage power (we tend to play places where sockets are limited).  You can get a good 6-8 hours out of batteries and for £1.99 from Aldi for eight it's worth changing them every couple of gigs.

I agree about putting your own stamp on stuff.  Unless its an essential sound that's integral to the song (thinking U2 delay or the wah in Voodoo Chile) then it's good to experiment with different sounds in songs