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#1 2009-02-18 10:55:23

djsam4eva
Junior Member
Registered: 2009-02-18
Posts: 1

Beginners classic guitar chords

Hi,

I am looking for guitar music with the following chords:
A, A7, E, Em, G, D, Am

Kind regards
Sam

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#2 2009-02-19 04:14:52

bob campeau
Junior Member
Registered: 2006-08-30
Posts: 10

Re: Beginners classic guitar chords

Try anything by Neil Young.

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#3 2009-02-19 04:16:27

bob campeau
Junior Member
Registered: 2006-08-30
Posts: 10

Re: Beginners classic guitar chords

Try anything by Neil Young.

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#4 2009-02-19 04:35:53

dmc
Junior Member
Registered: 2006-03-04
Posts: 9

Re: Beginners classic guitar chords

Hi, A7' s difficult  unless you got really small pointy fingers like a witch! C7's a lot easier(just drop the 5th finger after the C); try C to C7 to G...etc. Then have a look at Van morrison; and loads of other Irish tunes..smile ; Beatles, Credence Clear Water, T^hin Lizzy,Oasis wink good luck

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#5 2009-02-19 12:40:36

deadstring
Senior Member
From: Louisiana
Registered: 2008-11-06
Posts: 826
Website

Re: Beginners classic guitar chords

I see (like me) you are new to chordie. Click on Songs, choose a song you would like to learn, and if it comes up in chords you don't like, start hitting the transpose button. You will be surprised at how versatile chordie is once you try all the features. Welcome!


When the Power of Love overcomes The Love of Power the world will be a better place.

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#6 2009-02-20 00:02:02

edshaw
Junior Member
From: Colorado
Registered: 2006-11-20
Posts: 19
Website

Re: Beginners classic guitar chords

Great advice by deadstring, djs.
Look, you want exercise with A, A7, E, Em, G, D, Am
The standard 1-4-5 in A uses A, D, and E. So you can play in A.
The Key of D uses normally D, G, and A. So, you are good in the root key of D.
The two minor chords you know just happen to be the 5ths of those two keys. (Good deal)
Since you know E and A, then throw in B, the 5th of the E scale, and you have another, the E.
The transpose feature is a great thing. But I'll say, use it, yes, but also, learn the
principles of music theory upon which this tool is based. It leads you to learning
what a scale is, how it is structured, and how the notes of a scale can be referred
to numerically: that is, the C note is the one of the C scale, the D is the second "degree"
of that scale, and the E is the third, and so on. You will learn how sharps and flats
come into the picture. Then, you will be able to transpose on your own, and also
structure your learning to take full advantage of new chords that fit into your
work, as it almost looks like you have already done.

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#7 2009-02-22 23:20:10

AccoustikNoyz
Senior Member
From: Chesapeake,VA
Registered: 2008-11-12
Posts: 332
Website

Re: Beginners classic guitar chords

Great advice from Deadstring and Edshaw above.  Also Sam welcome to chordie.  Lastly, be sure to throw in the C chord in your repertoire as that will cover a lot of additional song choices.  If you include the C here's some songs that come to mind (use a capo for some).

Knockin On Heaven's Door - Dylan
Wagon Wheel - Dylan/Old Crow Medicine Show
Green Eyes - Coldplay

Good luck...Steve

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#8 2009-02-22 23:22:19

AccoustikNoyz
Senior Member
From: Chesapeake,VA
Registered: 2008-11-12
Posts: 332
Website

Re: Beginners classic guitar chords

bob campeau wrote:

Try anything by Neil Young.

Welcome Bob as well.  Yeah, Neil Young's a good idea.  Try Heart of Gold.   

r/Steve

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#9 2009-04-17 16:40:12

Anna_jams
Junior Member
Registered: 2009-04-17
Posts: 1

Re: Beginners classic guitar chords

Hi.
This will sound very stupid maybe but how do I know how many times I should play the chord until I change, in a song? A beginners question I know. smile

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#10 2009-04-17 17:04:29

KajiMa
Senior Member
From: Glastonbury
Registered: 2009-03-24
Posts: 607

Re: Beginners classic guitar chords

Hey Anna_jams,

It's not how many times you play the chord, but how long the chord lasts in time.

Most rock and pop is in 4/4 (pronounced "FOUR FOUR") often called "Common Time." This means that there are 4 beats in every bar. Some songs in 4/4 are fast and you might play the chord 4, 8 or perhaps even 16 times.

Some songs are slow and you might only play the chord once or twice in a bar. It's when you've counted "1, 2, 3, 4" and if there is a new chord on the next bar you change to it.

Alternatively, you might be on one chord, say a C, for a bar and a half and then halfway through the next bar you might change to a G. So you would count - 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, - whilst on the C, change to the G and finish the bar on it - 3, 4.

You might have strummed the C once during its' 6 beats and the G four times in its' 2 beats.

So strumming "x" number of times then changing cannot easily be answered without knowing what you are playing/learning. For now remember that it's how many beats the sound the chord makes lasts for.

This is the essence of rhythm.

Let me know if you need more help.

Last edited by KajiMa (2009-04-17 22:36:03)


<-----<< On an even field, only talent prevails! >>----->
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        >>-----> Rudhes hag Owres, Kajima <-----<<

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#11 2009-04-18 14:21:06

tubatooter1940
Retired Beach Bar Entertainer
From: Alabama Gulf Coast
Registered: 2008-06-24
Posts: 1812
Website

Re: Beginners classic guitar chords

Anna_jams wrote:

Hi.
This will sound very stupid maybe but how do I know how many times I should play the chord until I change, in a song? A beginners question I know. smile

If you play along with a recording of a song, you count the number of "beats" a chord lasts before you change to the next chord. You tap your foot along with the record and count the beats.
The song, "Stand by Me" has a chord progression of C, A minor, F and G.
You play C for 8 beats, A minor for 8 beats, F for 4 beats and G for four beats. Repeat until the song finishes or you get sick and tired of it.
Play along with the video:

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=2539741%3e
It's gotta be fun,
toots


We pronounce it "Guf Coast".
Ya'll wanna go down to the Guf?

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#12 2011-12-20 07:49:26

samvinto
Junior Member
Registered: 2011-12-20
Posts: 1

Re: Beginners classic guitar chords

With regards to strumming, I would recommend just strumming 4 beats a bar when learning the song if you are in doubt. This will give you a chance to get the hang of the chords without worrying about strumming at the same time. You can always develop the strumming side of things later when you are confident with the chords.

Sam
Guitar chords for beginners

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#13 2011-12-28 04:24:12

Boso
Banned
Registered: 2011-11-22
Posts: 7

Re: Beginners classic guitar chords

I did not heard about that song before...

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