Topic: F#m sus2

It is hard to find F#m sus2.  Is that because it does not exist.  I am not sure if the suspended chord drops down or goes up an half step making it a minor chord. 
Confused

Re: F#m sus2

I looked it up and it does exist. It's probably just a very uncommon chord.

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Re: F#m sus2

A suspended minor chord doesn't make any sense, and doesn't exist in any real sense.   Suspended chords are neither minor or major.

The reason?  Because in a suspended chord, you suspend the 3rd, and replace it with another note, in this case, the 2nd.  (sus2).   It is the 3rd that gives a chord it's minor or major flavor.  There is no difference between an F#sus and an F#msus.

You might see one written as a mSus, but that would be simply to keep things in key.

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Re: F#m sus2

It could be just an incorrect name for F#m9. The 9 and the 2 are the same note (G#). The difference being that, as Jerome says, in the sus chord you play the sus note instead of the 3rd (the G# instead of the A in this key).
The 9 chord would sound both the A and the G#. Quite a nice crunch.
I agree again with Jerome. It's written as such just to keep things in key.
If the song is in A minor and you are playing (open) A minor for example and you raise your 1st finger to
0
0
2
2
0
0

It would be more logical to call that Am sus2 than A sus2
There is always going to be this sort of problem with naming chords. The tab is the way to make it clear what is meant.