51

(10 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

This one is right in your wheelhouse buddy:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cUz-zA … e=youtu.be

Happy Holidays Scott,

DE 

Never been thrown out of a band, although I have walked away from a couple.  I have been thrown out of a bar before if that counts. And I also remember being thrown out of a strip joint in Daytona Beach once.  smile     

53

(16 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

I just got a text from Zurf. He played three old gospel songs at his father's funeral today.  Please keep Derek and his family in your thoughts and prayers.

Ken 

Hmmmm........ I always thought that applying liberal amounts of alcohol to my body to kill germs (internally of course) and paddling, hiking, camping and fishing would not only improve but extend my life. A wise old man once told me that God does not count days spent fishing against you - every day you spend fishing is another day you get to live longer.  And now to find out that 40 years of writing songs has also been good for me........ Look out Methuselah, you might have some competition smile smile smile

DE     

55

(9 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

Wish I could make it Joe but I'm committed to playing a gig on the 6th.  I will be in the Millersburg area the following weekend however for a camping/fishing get-together with friends on the Susquehanna River if the weather permits it.

DE 

56

(7 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

Ba ck in '77 when my buddies and I began to paddle serious whitewater, we planned a trip on the Chattooga (river that Deliverance was filmed on). As we had never paddled it before, three of us "scouted" the river by going  a day early and running the river with an outfitter in rafts. One of the raft guides had been one of the guides hired to haul cameramen, gear, etc on the river while the movie was filmed. He said most of the scenes were filmed on class II-III rapids, but the scene where Burt goes over the waterfall and breaks his leg was filmed on the upper river where paddling wasn't permitted.  According to the guide, a dummy was thrown in the river above the falls and filmed going over it. When the crew reviewed the film it looked like a dummy going over the falls. They tried it several times but it never looked the way they wanted. Finally Burt, being the kind of guy he was,  volunteered to go over the falls himself.  He went over the falls and disappeared out of sight, pulled under the water and finally emerging downstream, nearly drowned and coughing and spitting water.  When they reviewed the film they said it looked just like a dummy going over the falls. 

RIP Burt 

57

(11 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

Just curious Jim, are there any trademark infringement issues involved with using Gibson's logo on the headstock?

58

(11 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

Schweeeet!

DE

59

(11 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

I started out playing/teaching drums but after my initial teen-age fascination with rock "groups" in the 60's it was my attraction to the works of "singer/songwriters" that inspired me to try to play guitar. Early on it was John Denver's and Gordon Lightfoot's styles of playing that influenced the way I played. About the same time I really got hooked on listening to bluegrass music.  I've never been talented enough to play bluegrass lead licks but I incorporated the bluegrass style of doing bass runs and short licks between chord changes to my "folkie" style of playing, so I guess you could say I now play  in a sort of Folk/Americana/Bluegrass style. 

DE

60

(40 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

Hard to believe but a week has passed since I pulled into MKM and MKD's driveway and began a wonderful weekend of great fellowship, great music and great eats. As always, Jim and Amy were perfect hosts.  Their BYG is no place for a vegan - every meal included some form of pork they get from a local butcher.  Saturday morning's home-made biscuits and sausage gravy with bits of bacon in it was the best I ever had. And Saturday afternoon's pork butt barbecue with home-made potato salad and all the trimmings -Wow! It was Cris's and Uncle Joe's birthday so of course there was cake too.

It seems that Jim, Zurf, Robert (aka "Topdawg" or "da Judge") and I all have a taste for Kentucky bourbon so during the weekend there were several pauses to salute another " dead soldier" (empty bourbon bottle) as it was given a burial in the trash can.

Oh, and did I mention there was music? I logged somewhere around 12 hours in the "circle" over the weekend. MKM, MKD, Uncle Joe, Topdawg, JoeyJoeyJoey, Zurf and I took turns and were occasionally joined by MKM,MKD and JJJ's offspring.  We played 'til after midnight Friday and after 3 AM Saturday night. I headed home Sunday so I could help Jennifer with some projects. I took a "scenic" route so it took a little over 10 hours, but I still had a smile on my face when I walked into my house.

DE

61

(40 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

Put new La Bella strings on my acoustic for the first time and am looking forward to hearing how they perform this weekend.  I included a couple sets in my last string order as Classical Guitar recommended them.  Camping gear, chairs, clothes and bourbon are packed and stowed in my truck, guitars are staged at the kitchen door and ready to be loaded in the morning.  Alarm clock is set for 4 AM........... I think I'm good to go smile

DE

62

(40 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

We had quite an extensive canal system here in Ohio too Amy. Here in Ross county we had several locks and one of the canals connecting Lake Erie with the Ohio River ran through Chillicothe back in the early-mid 1800's. The lake in our city park was once a place where canal boats could turn around.

It's about a 9 hour drive for me so I plan to leave around 5 am. Looking forward to seeing and hearing everyone play again.

DE

63

(6 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

Congrats on #35 and glad you had a great time Jim. 

On my 35th I budgeted $10K to do what ever Jennifer wanted - trip to Europe,  Caribbean cruise, etc.  When I asked her - she just said "write me a song". I thought "Wow! this song-writing thing is finally paying off!".  I wrote a song titled "Shelter from the rain".  She liked it but said I was the only person in the world who would compare 35 years of marriage to a wet, soggy tent. smile

We've got #45 coming up in January - I'm curious what she'll want next.

Ken

64

(40 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

I should be there early Friday afternoon and will hang around and aggravate  Amy and Jim 'til Monday morning.

65

(12 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

Yep, unless something major comes up I plan to be at the backyard gathering.

This evening was another good'un.  One bass, 5 acoustics, two banjos, two fiddles, one dobro, one mando and about an extra 20 folks that just came to listen. We played for about 3 hours and then after most folks left, four of us sat around and played some old Merle, Willie, Hank and Johnny tunes for another hour.

DE

66

(12 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

The OV has been in a humidified case and waiting for you ever since you told me you were interested, and it'll be there unless you tell me otherwise.  Cool that you plan to have different set-ups with your guitars.  Have you thought about a Nashville tuned axe too?

I wish you lived closer.  For the past six months I've been attending Monday evening jams with with a bunch of old gospel and country pickers/singers that used to play in local groups and did some touring years ago. (At 68, I'm one of the youngest that attends)  We play for about 3 1/2 hours at a rec center, have coffee, donuts and bean soup/spaghetti/pulled pork or whatever someone brings. A few weeks ago there were four guitars, two dobros, two banjos, two mandos and three fiddles although most times its about half that number.  Some of those folks can still belt out some strong vocals on them old gospel songs and the harmonies can be amazing at times.  I'm leaving for the jam in about an hour and I'm getting fired up just thinking about it.

DE

67

(12 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

Zurf wrote:

I am still interested in that guitar DE. I want to convert one of my guitars to an open tuning slide guitar, which will necessitate a high bridge and a nut cover such that it won't be real easy to go back and forth.  I'd be more likely to sell my Martin 12 string, which I don't use near as much as I thought I would, or possibly my Ovation solid-body bass, in order to buy the micro-bass. Not sure if the Breedlove I bought from you will become a slide guitar, or the Ohio Valley.

I know you already have the hat, and I'm assuming you have the proper sunglasses to play blues on a slide guitar smile

I've also got an older Sigma DM-3 that is already set pretty high and could be converted to play slide. I'd sell it for a lot less than the OV.

DE

68

(12 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

Oh, man - my brain is on a totally  different wave length Zurf.  When I read the title of your post the first thing I thought of was lust for a 20" smallmouth bass......... smile

Are you still interested in my Ohio Valley acoustic, or has the 23" scale micro-bass now went to the top of the list?

DE

69

(14 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

Thanks for the youtube link TF.  I've tried plastic welding with some success but since the damage occurs at an impact area, it tends to crack again.  There was an associated video that showed the use of wire screen to strengthen the area.  I've never thought of trying that - it might just work!

DE

70

(14 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

Re-glued the bridge on my river guitar (Recording King- copy of a Martin) after carefully checking the dimensions against my real Martin 12 fret 000 size acoustic.  I found an epoxy which claims to hold at temps from 10 degrees F to 180 degrees F,  so it should hold up in any future camping/fishing adventures. Played it for about an hour, seems to be good as new.  Also used it to repair my paddle  and now need to make a better repair on my SOT.

DE

71

(14 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

I actually own more kayaks than guitars TF.

The SOT I took on the float was a Wilderness Systems Tarpon 12, a gift from my co-workers when I retired 6 years ago.  I built my first kayak (skin-on-wood frame) back in 1969 and at last count have owned 28 different kayaks over the years. Like you, as I got older and my bad knees made it harder to get in and out of my SIKs, I switched to SOTs about 10 years ago.  I still have two SIKs hanging from my garage ceiling (Perception Acadias) that my wife and I used to paddle.  My first SOT was a 12' Native Watercraft that had good storage capacity and a good paddler, but I wanted a shorter boat for some of the tight,rocky streams I fish so I bought a Wilderness Systems Tarpon 10.  I liked the boat but it had those annoying "ankle biter" foot braces.  A couple years later my local boat shop (owned by one of my paddling buddies) offered me a deal on the newer Tarpon 10 with adjustable braces so I bought one.  When I received the Tarpon 12 as a retirement gift I now had two 12' and two 10'  SOTs  so I gave a couple to my son and his wife. With the birth of a son a couple years ago they never get the chance to get out and paddle and really don't have storage space so recently he asked if I minded taking them back.

Sooo...... I now have 2 rec SIK, 1 WW SIK and 4 SOTs hanging from the garage ceiling, along with a 16' river canoe, 17' lake canoe and two rafts. big_smile

Choosing a yak is like choosing a vehicle - everyone has different opinions.  However, from my experience SOTs are a lot more comfortable to paddle and fish from (easy to enter/exit, sit side-ways and hang your feet over the side, access your cooler and gear easier, etc) but they are much heavier and if you run the steep, shallow, rocky streams I tend to float, rocks will eventually damage the area around the scupper holes, especially in the area under the seat where most of the weight is concentrated.

At least once a year I put new kevlar patches on the hull cracks but since kayak hulls flex more than canoes, the patches eventually fail or crack from hard impacts with rocks. On my recent float I took shoe goop, contact cement and some flexible hypalon (raft material) patches for emergency repairs.  Besides the kayak damage and guitar bridge failing I also needed to repair a cracked paddle blade and my Keen wading sandals. The goop and glue did a pretty good job.

PS - The guitar was on old beater "river guitar", but I should have it playable again by the end of the week.

DE

Sometimes plans just fall apart. For months some friends and I planned a float trip on the John Day river in Oregon.  With drought conditions and water levels falling quickly on the JD, we went to a back-up plan and floated the Buffalo River in Arkansas last week. We knew the water level would be a little low and temps would be hot but planned do a week-long float, only covering about 5-6 miles each day while fishing, make an early camp and supper, then play music around a campfire until the early hours.

The first day went as planned, the temp was about 96 deg F, too hot to build a fire, but after supper I played guitar and one of my paddling buddies (John K Victor - local artist and musician) wailed on his harmonicas.  The next day changed everything - water was so clear I couldn't tell if rocks were 2 inches or 6 inches under the water.   I banged into a subsurface rock, knocked a hole in my kayak and took in about a gallon of water every ten minutes for the rest of the day, having to stop every half hour to empty water out of my SOT (sit-on-top kayak). When we finally stopped to camp, I made temporary repairs to my boat with shoe goop, we ate supper and settled in for a little river-side music. Again it was too hot to build a fire.  But the biggest surprise came when I pulled my guitar out of a dry bag and opened up the case - the intense heat had loosened the glue and string tension popped off the saddle.  In all my river trips that never happened before!  The rest of the week was spent fishing, bailing, and trying to endure the heat, but no music playing. sad

DE

73

(7 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

From the time I saw Joan Baez walk out on a stage by herself with just an acoustic guitar and mesmerize an audience for two hours, I've been fascinated by those who use their guitar playing styles to complement their vocals/lyrics, so I suppose my biggest influences have been: 

Joan Baez
John Denver
Gordon Lightfoot
James Taylor
Kris Kristofferson
John Prine
Darrell Scott
Fred Eaglesmith
Scott Miller


DE

74

(10 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

beamer wrote:

i cant function with out my music.  I play  and I listen. 

When the sound of your own drum becomes more important than the sound of the band, You need to step back and decide why your playing.

Interesting quote Scott.  Is it yours?  I think it's a good concept for a song.

As my signature line indicates, I'm not a "band" type person, preferring to do things solo and my own way - I not only like marching to the beat of a different drum, I want to be the drummer.  big_smile

75

(3 replies, posted in Chordie's Chat Corner)

Other than family get-togethers the only other thing I usually do is go fishing.  The last couple years though, Jen and I have been invited to join friends at a local campground for a cook-out, fireworks and jam session.

DE