Topic: Finger style

Been trying to travis pick thumb wrks well, as soon as my finger go to the higher strings for the melody line everything go's to pot.Any suggestions on how to practice moving my fingers on my roght hand w/o messing up my timing?  Thnx Tim

Re: Finger style

I would suggest getting a book on it, I have one and it makes it easier to learn its almost impossible to self learn it but it can be done, I couldn't do it and got the book just have to go slow with it till it clicks. good luck smile

"Growing old is not for sissies"

Re: Finger style

I'm not a good picker either. Just practice really slow because your muscle memory develops from that. If you go fast and make mistakes your fingers remember that.  Slow. I shouldn't really be saying anything. I can't do it either.

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I have finally found happiness in my life.  Guitars, singing, beer and camping.  And they all intertwine wonderfully.

Re: Finger style

I've only gotten as far as the Mark Knopfler style, which is to pick with the thumb, the index, and the middle finger. The ring finger and pinky are anchored somewhere for a reference point. The true classical guitarists (and many finger-style guys/gals) suspend their picking hand, and still don't lose the position ... scares the b'jeebers outta me!

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Re: Finger style

Learn the finger parts and thumb parts separately. Tried that yet?

Re: Finger style

bensonp wrote:

I'm not a good picker either. Just practice really slow because your muscle memory develops from that. If you go fast and make mistakes your fingers remember that.  Slow. I shouldn't really be saying anything. I can't do it either.

Have to agree with Pete. Start practice slow, for me it's rediculously s l o w. Speed will grow at its own pace as long as you are accurate with your fingering.

Live in the "now" - a contentment of the moment - the past is gone - the future doesn't exist - all we ever really have is now and it's always "now".

Re: Finger style

All this talk about finger-style guitar had me going over some of Michael Chapdelaine's excellent work ... here's a sample:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IeqrD2RcACM

For me, this is true finger-style, where the guitarist isn't really using any anchor point, other than his/her forearm on the body of the guitar. Not many do it better than Mr. Chapdelaine, as evidenced by this Taylor Winfield 98 guitar he won in competition.

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Re: Finger style

It's easier to practice and develop your own style than to try and copy someone else. Start with some early Dylan and concentrate more on keeping the rhythm, eventually your own style will come through.
Having said that, I've tried playing some James Taylor and Bert Jansch, they are just on a different planet.

Thick as two short planks

Re: Finger style

Tenement Funster wrote:

All this talk about finger-style guitar had me going over some of Michael Chapdelaine's excellent work ... here's a sample:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IeqrD2RcACM

For me, this is true finger-style, where the guitarist isn't really using any anchor point, other than his/her forearm on the body of the guitar. Not many do it better than Mr. Chapdelaine, as evidenced by this Taylor Winfield 98 guitar he won in competition.

excellent picking smile

"Growing old is not for sissies"

Re: Finger style

How do you make it smooth? 

Practice. 

Practice very, very, very slowly with a metronome.  Slowly increase speed.

"If it comes from the heart and you add a few beers... it'll be awesome!" - Mekidsmom

Official recipient of B chord amnesty.

Re: Finger style

I have played classical guitar for a very long time and I also teach classical. I agree with those who say to practice finger picking slowly and gradually increase speed. If you give up using a pick and just use your thumb and fingers it will soon become a natural progression. Another suggestion, you do not need to grow out long nails to finger pick. Personally I play without nails on my right hand and have caluses on my finger tips and believe you feel the music more than those who play with finger nails. For those who are self taught watch some videos of Travis picking. It is a good start and once you have the general feeling of using your thumb and two fingers and it feels good, then you can use your thumb and three fingers and then you can use your right hand at will depending on the song you want to play. The entire process can take a year or longer however once you devote the time you will have the talent forever.

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

Re: Finger style

Welcome to Chordie, CG!

I'm especially grateful that you're here, as I began taking classical guitar lessons several years ago, but didn't stick with it. Your post has encouraged me to revisit the fundamentals I was taught, and I only hope I can follow through with the consistent practice needed to get good at it. My teacher insisted that I start without an anchor finger (wrist above the space between the soundhole & bridge) and I found it challenging, to say the least. I think I was trying to learn too many new skills at once, and got discouraged.

Your post has me looking at learning one thing at a time, and I think I'll get along better that way. Thanks!!!

ACOUSTICS:  Cordoba D10-CE / LaPatrie "Concert" / Takamine GD30CE-12 / Norman ST30
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13 (edited by Tenement Funster 2016-02-10 20:52:26)

Re: Finger style

Is this the best tutorial ever ... or what?!?!?!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXL_O5azpbE

Mike Chapdelaine gives a step-by-step lesson on to learn this great piece he plays in my Oct 15, 2015  post above ("Somebody That I Used to Know" by Gotye). So this is my project, to learn this song. Mucha practicia necesaria!!!

ACOUSTICS:  Cordoba D10-CE / LaPatrie "Concert" / Takamine GD30CE-12 / Norman ST30
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Re: Finger style

Tenement Funster wrote:

Is this the best tutorial ever ... or what?!?!?!

  Very cool - I like his style of passing on knowledge. I have to give it a try, it's going to take a long time-but hey, I'm retired and got nothing but time to fill.

Live in the "now" - a contentment of the moment - the past is gone - the future doesn't exist - all we ever really have is now and it's always "now".

Re: Finger style

I spent a year trying to learn fingerstyle without much success.  Then I realized that although I'm an intermediate guitarist, I am a beginner at fingerstyle.  I bought a course called "Anyone can play Fingerstyle Guitar" from Melbay and within 2 weeks I was getting it.  That was about 5 years ago and now the majority of what I play is fingerstyle.  It opens up a whole new world of guitar playing.

Re: Finger style

http://www.desismileys.com/smileys/desismileys_6865.gif to the board reverb. smile

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Re: Finger style

Welcome to Chordie Reverb!!

Another fingerstyle player here!  I own picks, but long since forgot how to hold onto one...... jus' keep growin' them nails.

"what is this quintessence of dust?"  - Shakespeare

Re: Finger style

Here is another very good video on finger picking.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHDwX3HT9oA

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

19 (edited by Classical Guitar 2016-02-13 12:36:27)

Re: Finger style

One more thought. This is a video of Andes Segovia who is considered the father of current classical guitar. He was born in 1893 and in1928 Segovia made his American debut in New York City. This is video of him. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2eBnfzngq9Y

What is interesting is he had short stubby large fingers and most of the early players did not have long finger nails. It was unheard of then and the long nails are more of recent trend. You do not need long nails to finger pick. I do concerts and have never had long nails. Today many of those you see with long nails cut some of them from ping pong balls and glue them to their nails and coat them with layers of hardener. They then shape their nails to look more normal. When you look at them they look long yet they look  white in color.

My point is any one can learn to play either classical guitar or steel sting guitar without long nails. And as Andes Segovia proved long ago, you can play great with short stubby fingers without long nails. There are no rules on who can learn to finger pick and who can not. You just need to spend the time to practice and learn to play the music you like.

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

Re: Finger style

Classical Guitar wrote:

One more thought. This is a video of Andes Segovia who is considered the father of current classical guitar. He was born in 1893 and in1928 Segovia made his American debut in New York City. This is video of him. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2eBnfzngq9Y

What is interesting is he had short stubby large fingers and most of the early players did not have long finger nails. It was unheard of then and the long nails are more of recent trend. You do not need long nails to finger pick. I do concerts and have never had long nails. Today many of those you see with long nails cut some of them from ping pong balls and glue them to their nails and coat them with layers of hardener. They then shape their nails to look more normal. When you look at them they look long yet they look  white in color.

My point is any one can learn to play either classical guitar or steel sting guitar without long nails. And as Andes Segovia proved long ago, you can play great with short stubby fingers without long nails. There are no rules on who can learn to finger pick and who can not. You just need to spend the time to practice and learn to play the music you like.

I read somewhere that Segovia used to practice for hours every day well into his old age and the article pointed out he was the 1st to transpose classical music to guitar, I have seen several of his videos and can understand his dedication. Another guitarist I recall hearing was Sebecas(dont no the proper spelling) he played flamenco and was quite excellent.

"Growing old is not for sissies"

21 (edited by Classical Guitar 2016-02-14 21:52:07)

Re: Finger style

Andes Segovia did practice tirelessly late in his life. He did not want his talent to decrease and from I understand he practiced at least 4 hours a day until he knew it was time to cut back.

Sabicas was wonderful and made great strides in flamingo guitar. He as actually born in who on March16, 1912 in Spain. His loved flamingo and started playing guitar at around age 4. As great as he was he later lived in New York and had numerous strokes and died from pneumonia. He played pieces on the guitar that up until he did it was not thought possible to play on a guitar. Thank you for mentioning him. Most classical guitarist know well who Andes Segovia was what he did. Few know who Segovia was and what he contributed and how great he was.

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

Re: Finger style

When I saw Flamenco mentioned, I immediately thought of Benjamin Wood's unique twist on this style:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqHVM6cZI30

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Re: Finger style

reverb1000 wrote:

I spent a year trying to learn fingerstyle without much success.  Then I realized that although I'm an intermediate guitarist, I am a beginner at fingerstyle.  I bought a course called "Anyone can play Fingerstyle Guitar" from Melbay and within 2 weeks I was getting it.  That was about 5 years ago and now the majority of what I play is fingerstyle.  It opens up a whole new world of guitar playing.

Hi Reverb ... thanks for the very helpful advice. I ordered the Mel Bay DVD course that you recommended and endorsed, and am looking forward to "expanding the horizons" so to speak. Much obliged for your help and encouragement!

ACOUSTICS:  Cordoba D10-CE / LaPatrie "Concert" / Takamine GD30CE-12 / Norman ST30
ELECTRICS:  EP Les Paul Custom Pro / Gretsch Streamliner G2420T
AMPS:  Traynor YCS50 / Peavey VK212 / Traynor AM150T
EFFECTS: Boss ME-80 Multi-effects / Ibanez WD7 wah

Re: Finger style

Here is an interesting song. Michael Lucarelli is very good and is popular. Any of you who play any type of guitar should be able to play the notes in the song. What gives it the sound is the right hand and how he picks the song. Here is the link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kjEvg_ZkgI

The song is called Fur Elise and is by Beethoven . I play it too and regardless of the appearance it is not hard to play. It just takes practice.

Here is another of him playing Dust in The Wind. It is a basic Travis Pick and no more. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJB6-qMQ_3s

Here is Kansas playing the same song. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tH2w6Oxx0kQ
Moderator edited to correct bad link in original post: re:  Fur Elise

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

Re: Finger style

Very good rendition by Mr. Lucarelli ... thanks for the link. As you advised, I watched his right hand throughout, and noticed how he used the varied tones of the guitar, moving from the bridge to the neck and back, when it suited the melody / mood of the piece ... and so smoothly.

ACOUSTICS:  Cordoba D10-CE / LaPatrie "Concert" / Takamine GD30CE-12 / Norman ST30
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