Re: Classical Guitars And Others

Doug_Smith wrote:

This is something like what you are seeing on the Yamaha from a different angle courtesy of the Taylor Guitar Folks.
https://www.taylorguitars.com/sites/def … k=ynki-UBr
I personally use a variation of this but more like the high E string with one "twist" before diving behind the bridge... particularly notice how each string is also "clinched" by it's neighbor.  No slipping that way for sure!

Doug I am not a fan of interlacing strings like what Taylor Guitar shows. It looks nice however if you want or need to change just one string to undo two or three stings to change one is a problem. If you keep each string separate then you can change one without any problem. I have used the same string on guitars for years and still buy then in a 3 pack and enough for more than a year at a time.  As good as they are once in a blue moon I will have one that just does not sound right, so I change it.

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

Re: Classical Guitars And Others

I change the wound strings often but leave the 3 nylon for months.  I hear no degrading at all...got G, B, E's comin' out my ears.

Martin 0-18t  tenor guitar/MyaMoe baritone ukulele
Kamaka HF-4 baritone/Outdoor tenor ukulele
Kay El Bee baritone ukulele
Vega Little wonder tenor banjo

Re: Classical Guitars And Others

I usually change all of mine at the same time, and base it on sound. That normally means 10 to 15 hours of playing time.

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

Re: Classical Guitars And Others

Classical Guitar wrote:

I usually change all of mine at the same time, and base it on sound. That normally means 10 to 15 hours of playing time.

Well that confirms it !!  I don't play mine NEARLY OFTEN enough ! wink
At that rate, I'd be changing strings like every 5-6 Years.... on the other hand though it wouldn't feel so strange when I do get a hankering to play .... and I'd be better at it. Neck's too wide & flat, action's too high, fingers getting fat, posture, posture, etc... sigh.

"what is this quintessence of dust?"  - Shakespeare

Re: Classical Guitars And Others

Doug_Smith wrote:
Classical Guitar wrote:

I usually change all of mine at the same time, and base it on sound. That normally means 10 to 15 hours of playing time.

Well that confirms it !!  I don't play mine NEARLY OFTEN enough ! wink
At that rate, I'd be changing strings like every 5-6 Years.... on the other hand though it wouldn't feel so strange when I do get a hankering to play .... and I'd be better at it. Neck's too wide & flat, action's too high, fingers getting fat, posture, posture, etc... sigh.

Sometimes as you describe yourself a larger flatter neck of a classical might  be easier to play.  And if you are  more comfortable playing on your right leg that is okay too. I helped a guy who had a Rotator Cuff Repair change from a steel string to a classical guitar. He soon liked the sound and easier fingering he just plays the same music he always played except on a classical, and he plays on his right leg just like he always has. It is comfortable for him.

Doug I am not saying a classical guitar is right for every one at all. Just a thought .....it might fit your hands better.  From the number of posts you have, you have a world of knowledge and you have  been generous enough to share it. Thank you for the work you as a Moderator.

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

Re: Classical Guitars And Others

CG, Actually I'm criticising myself for not being more diligent in what and how I play.  Grown lazy and just plain sloppy.... the Classical requires attention to all the right things I should be doing, and brings out sonically all the things I have overlooked.  Many of which I have suggested to others in their journey like elevating the neck to get the thumb in better position for barre chords without undue stress on the wrist causing cramping (and potential carpal tunnel damage), locating the correct strings with the plucking fingers without support and such.  The electric guitar was making such a "slob" out of me I went (willingly) back to acoustic for similar reasons.  Once in awhile though, I revert and realise how easy it is to "hide" poor technique with effects and a wall of "noise".....

You have to get back to your "roots" now and again to see how far you haven't progressed, but it's still fun, and one of those things you can derive great satisfaction out of in your "old age".

I enjoy our conversations and look forward to meeting you at one of the Chordie functions sometime/where down the road. wink smile

"what is this quintessence of dust?"  - Shakespeare