1 (edited by Classical Guitar 2018-10-03 09:02:25)

Topic: Reading Music

I use sheet music when learning a new song . These sheets also show melody, fingering, and timing.  How many  Chordie members can also read music?

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

Re: Reading Music

not me     

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Re: Reading Music

I have a rudimentary understanding of sheet music. I know the notes on the staff, a couple of the key signatures, the treble (G) and bass (F) clef, and the time signature. The key of C has no sharps or flats and E and B have no sharp. But I never took the time to actually learn to read the music. I read music the way a first grader would read a book. See Jane Run. See Spot Run.     

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Re: Reading Music

I can read music but prefer to not. smile

Generally, the music I play requires chord charts and lyrics.     

Re: Reading Music

Drum music - all on one line. smile

Bill     

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Re: Reading Music

I'm with BGD on this one - I can read, but slowly. I was never taught, mostly picking it up from books, so there are potentially big 'holes' in what I know.

I find it interesting that, now my son has started to learn piano (well,m I think he's 4 years in "starting"), he's teaching me a few things. Similarly, I am teaching him some things that are more "free form", as I've been in a jam with other people who need the sheet music to jam "blues in A" ...

Cheers

Richard     

-[ Musician, writer, guitarist, poor singer ]-
My songs             http://neophytte.mine.nu/audio/
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Re: Reading Music

neophytte wrote:

I'm with BGD on this one - I can read, but slowly. I was never taught, mostly picking it up from books, so there are potentially big 'holes' in what I know.

I find it interesting that, now my son has started to learn piano (well,m I think he's 4 years in "starting"), he's teaching me a few things. Similarly, I am teaching him some things that are more "free form", as I've been in a jam with other people who need the sheet music to jam "blues in A" ...

Cheers

Richard

Your second paragraph got me perfectly.

I can read music, I just don’t need to any longer.  At one point I had to play moonlight sonata and transpose it to any key within a 4 count.  Can’t do that without reading music smile

But the genre I play features lots of improvisation, so working knowledge of music theory is a lot more important than playing stuff note for note.     

Re: Reading Music

I can't read music,  in elementary school sheet music just looked like bugs on the paper, no one noticed that I needed glasses.  I played bugle in a drum and bugle corp when I was in my early teens, the music instructor would play what I was supposed to play and I just copied what he played.     

Live in the "now" - a contentment of the moment - the past is gone - the future doesn't exist - all we ever really have is now and it's always "now".

9 (edited by Tenement Funster 2018-10-04 09:51:32)

Re: Reading Music

Great topic, CG ... lots to explore.

What UJB describes is pretty much where I am. When learning a new song, I'll sometimes take the sheet music to the piano, and pluck out the notes until I've found them all. It's slow work because I can't read music at the speed it's to be played. For some reason, I find a piano is much easier to work out chord structures, before taking that over to the guitar, and playing the roots, fifths and sevenths together to find each chord.

10 (edited by Classical Guitar 2018-10-04 19:24:16)

Re: Reading Music

I admit I am surprised more of great members don't read music. When I take new students the first thing I tell them is to forget what they taught themselves if they want to learn. Second we spend sometimes up to 3 months learning how to read music, play from music sheets, and correct timing. Only then do we start playing.

I usually play from music sheet, although I can play from chords, riffs, or Nashville numbering. With true classical guitar playing from music sheets is the only real way to play. I know I am to odd man out here. I still admire how many play well from Chords and some of them require a spread of your left hand that requires lots of talent.

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

11 (edited by Jandle 2018-10-05 01:14:37)

Re: Reading Music

Nope I don`t read music at all when playing however I can work out the notes slowly at a snails pace if I had too.  It's interesting though because a group I am in that play at rest homes and retirement villages, some members can read music ... but one of them who reads music her timing is always out and quite often it is hard work learning new songs with her because she doesn't HEAR music only reads it.  Often it ruins the song we are learning or we have to spend ages learning it as she doesnt have an ear to hear how it should go.     

(Edited to fix typo on the word or by Jandle)

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Re: Reading Music

Tenement Funster wrote:

Great topic, CG ... lots to explore.

What UJB describes is pretty much where I am. When learning a new song, I'll sometimes take the sheet music to the piano, and pluck out the notes until I've found them all. It's slow work because I can't read music at the speed it's to be played. For some reason, I find a piano is much easier to work out chord structures, before taking that over to the guitar, and playing the roots, fifths and sevenths together to find each chord.

I have a hunch that you started on piano and later moved to guitar, and that your first piano lesson was when you were fairly young.     

Re: Reading Music

I actually started on classical guitar when I was 15.  I took  lessons from one instructor for two years and after my recital he came to me and said her could teach me any more and an very good  classical guitarist who normally did not teach heard my instructor and he  came to listen to my recital. So I traveled twice a week to work with this new guy who said he take me to the next level. I took from him for two years and he gave what pieces he wanted me to play at a recital and wanted me to play for at least an hour. After that he said all I need was to play every second I  could and I have done that and through  6 years in college I still spent time playing. Through a 35 year career I still   played and sometimes it was very late at night when I played. So I retired very early so I could play, do more concerts, and have never charged someone who I believe could be good and can not afford to pay for lessons. So I read music to play classical guitar  and do no play piano.     

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

Re: Reading Music

Baldguitardude wrote:
Tenement Funster wrote:

Great topic, CG ... lots to explore.

What UJB describes is pretty much where I am. When learning a new song, I'll sometimes take the sheet music to the piano, and pluck out the notes until I've found them all. It's slow work because I can't read music at the speed it's to be played. For some reason, I find a piano is much easier to work out chord structures, before taking that over to the guitar, and playing the roots, fifths and sevenths together to find each chord.

I have a hunch that you started on piano and later moved to guitar, and that your first piano lesson was when you were fairly young.

Good hunch, BGD, and that would normally be a safe bet ... but not in this case. I just find the piano easier to picture the notes / triads / chords on, than I can on a guitar's fret board. I can't play a piano at all other than tinkering around a bit.     

Re: Reading Music

Classical Guitar wrote:

I admit I am surprised more of great members don't read music. When I take new students the first thing I tell them is to forget what they taught themselves if they want to learn. Second we spend sometimes up to 3 months learning how to read music, play from music sheets, and correct timing. Only then do we start playing.

I usually play from music sheet, although I can play from chords, riffs, or Nashville numbering. With true classical guitar playing from music sheets is the only real way to play. I know I am to odd man out here. I still admire how many play well from Chords and some of them require a spread of your left hand that requires lots of talent.

Your teaching methods are definitely the right way to go, CG, and something us self-taught people should pay more attention to. Many of us started by just learning to play the chords for a song we liked, and went from there. It's admittedly not a good foundation to build on, because we never really learn why different notes go together, until we get some theory in the picture. I just started working on that a few years ago, so would have to forget over 50 years of self-taught playing to do it right.

Maybe age-related senility will help me with that! lol     

Re: Reading Music

Well, this popped up on Udemy today:

https://www.udemy.com/music-theory-and- … RIENDS2018

Free course for theory and reading music (which it sounds like most of us - excluding CG - could do with smile ), I'm already enrolled ...     

-[ Musician, writer, guitarist, poor singer ]-
My songs             http://neophytte.mine.nu/audio/
My Soundcloud   https://soundcloud.com/neophytte1
My YouTube         https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHnDpTAPTUE&list=PLhpGn51pPqN6q8kmuORnuWcAXRF1_b1zV

Re: Reading Music

My ability to read music is not great (though probably still better than most non-classical guitarists). I'd love to be better, but I'm not really going to find myself in situations where I need to read so other things are a higher priority for me.

What DOES really bother me, though, is the number of guitarists who can't read rhythms. I can understand that TAB or fret diagrams sometimes make more sense for WHERE to play the notes, but knowing WHEN to play them is so important.     

Re: Reading Music

mmfletcher welcome to Chordie and thank you for your first post.  When I first asked the question I was curious because many off the Chordie members play from chords or tabs. It is what works  best for each member that is the most important thing.     

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

Re: Reading Music

i first picked up a guitar at age 15 then bought a song in a day book but discarded all the technical stuff and just learned the chords because all i wanted was to be able to sing. a few years later a guy i was working with was training to be a music teacher so he practiced on me. he lost interest when i began missing lessons  in preference to football (soccer). some of it has stuck, i still know all the notes on the keyboard and the fingerboard and i actually learned "Mandy" from the copy. my main reason for learning music notation was to be able to write music so i wouldn't forget in the morning what i'd written last night...does that make sense?     

Ask not what Chordie can do for you, but what you can do for Chordie.

Re: Reading Music

Phill Williams wrote:

i first picked up a guitar at age 15 then bought a song in a day book but discarded all the technical stuff and just learned the chords

That was me too except I was 19.     

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[b]Today Is Only Yesterdays Tomorrow[/b]

21 (edited by Peatle Jville 2018-10-30 04:26:24)

Re: Reading Music

I admire people that can read music and understand music theory.     I have very limited understanding of both.