Topic: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

One of the things I want to learn to do is play an open G with fingers 2-4 instead of my normal 1-3.  I'm fighting almost 45 years of muscle memory, but I'm working on it.
Sometimes. 
Occasionally. 
OK, rarely, but I'll get there one day.

Anyway, one of the reasons the 2-4 fingering would be handy is that it frees the index finger up to play around with the D, G and B strings to add some flair to the G chord.  One of those "flairs" is a Gsus4, which I find I'd like to have available.

(I also know about fingers 2-4 being handy for quicker changes to G7 and C, but that's a different topic.)

Back to our story:  I realized that even playing an open G with fingers 1-3, I can move my index from A(fret 2) to B(fret 1), and mute the A with the pad of my middle finger (still on low E 3rd fret) and play:  3x0013.  Voila!  A Gsus4.

[For those of you who read this and said:  "Well, duh!", forgive me.  I'm a little slow on the uptake sometimes.  smile ]

The moral is:  if you need a chord, experiment.  You can find a way to play it.  "If it sounds good, it is good." - Topdown.

"Just because you've always done it that way doesn't mean it's not incredibly stupid." - Despair, Inc.

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

I think that is the way to go, however, as you said, that old muscle you used for many years doesn't change easily.  But it can be done.  Lots of practice man.

You can see all my video covers on [url]http://www.youtube.com/bensonp1000[/url]
I have finally found happiness in my life.  Guitars, singing, beer and camping.  And they all intertwine wonderfully.

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

There are advantages to playing the G chord with both fingerings , I learned an alternate fingering when I was a boy , thumb on the 6th string and index on the 1 string. I play it most of the time with the 2,3,4 fingering and recommend it to beginners , but I practice the 1,2,3 fingering because it has it's advantages to. It does take some practice to try and teach them hard headed fingers to use the fingering your brain is telling it use smile

I find the 2,3,4  fingering is easier for me to embellish the G chord  than the other, but for some songs the 1,2,3 is better.

Later, Wayne P

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

You can also play it as a Dm7/G.

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

Way back when I  was teaching myself the chords I found the  2,3,4 easier + it was a quick drop to C, F and D.  I rearly use the 1,2,3 unless Im playing Every Rose Has Its Thorn since its mostly G and G6sus4 (or C major with out the index) or I Hear the Music D and G.  Come to think of it, I dont even think about it now, i just go for what is more comfy with the changeout.

Zen guitar is nothing more than playing the song we’re all born with inside - The one that makes us human.

–Phil Toshio Sudo
Author of Zen Guitar

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

Baldguitardude wrote:

You can also play it as a Dm7/G.

I don't follow you, but let me sus it out (pun intended):

Notes in a Gsus4 = G C D

Dm7/G = 3 x(or 0) 0 2 1 1 = notes:  G x(or A) D A C F

Extra notes:  A and F.

I don't have a guitar handy right now to hear it but that reads more like an expanded G7 to me.  Help?

"Just because you've always done it that way doesn't mean it's not incredibly stupid." - Despair, Inc.

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

beamer wrote:

.... Im playing Every Rose Has Its Thorn since its mostly G and G6sus4 (or C major with out the index) ....

C major 7

smile

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

Baldguitardude wrote:
beamer wrote:

.... Im playing Every Rose Has Its Thorn since its mostly G and G6sus4 (or C major with out the index) ....

C major 7

smile

YEA LIKE HE SAID, lol  I just look them up on Jguitar.  I gues I could say G and just drop 1 and 2  a string each LOLOLOL.

Zen guitar is nothing more than playing the song we’re all born with inside - The one that makes us human.

–Phil Toshio Sudo
Author of Zen Guitar

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

beamer wrote:

I gues I could say G and just drop 1 and 2  a string each LOLOLOL.

I play Every Rose ... from time to time as well.  It was one of the first songs I got serious about learning because it is fairly easy to play and because my wife likes it.

I've never used a Cmaj7 but try this and see how it sounds to you:

In the verses and first part of the chorus, when you are alternating between G and "C", try alternating between these two:
  -  G as: 320033 (add that extra D on the B string)
  -  C (something) as:  x32033 (keep fingers 3 and 4 anchored from the G and move fingers 1 and 2 to the C position on the A and D strings).

I like the sound of that.  Everywhere else in the song I just use an open G and C.

"Just because you've always done it that way doesn't mean it's not incredibly stupid." - Despair, Inc.

10 (edited by beamer 2013-06-04 04:12:00)

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

yep I play it taht way also. just depends on how lazy i want to be LOLOL you should check out the When I hear the music. its fun to paly and here is the acoustic version.   OOPS its called LET IT PLAY and go to 11:28  (but its all good)  You will notice Brett is playing a 12 the whole show.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xy_j6-jyov8

Zen guitar is nothing more than playing the song we’re all born with inside - The one that makes us human.

–Phil Toshio Sudo
Author of Zen Guitar

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

Re Every Rose, I play it as you wrote it above. That's a C add 9. The third fret on the b string is a D, which is the 9 you're adding. Regarding the Dm7/G, your voicing is correct! How it sounds depends upon how you use the chord. In fact, a lot of chords change texture depending upon how they're used.

Example: My band plays a lot of blues-based rock and funky stuff. Our bass player is really active so I don't have to play full chords. I mostly play thirds, sevenths, ninths, and other chord extensions and let him handle the bass note. He can move from bass note to bass note and change the chord without me changing any notes at all, or more frequently with me just changing one note.

To hear an easy example of how this sounds, play this:

x
5
5
5
x
x

That probably sounds like C major to you. So put the C in the root to define the chord as C Major:

x
5
5
5
3
x

Now play this:

x
5
5
5
x
5

That's an A minor 7...which from theory you know is the relative minor of C. The point being you don't have to change notes to change chords. Cool, but motion to a relative minor being a bit too easy, let's do a tougher one.

I play this in Use Me by Bill Withers (chord tone names added for reference):

Em7
x
12 (5)
12 (b3)
12 (b7)
x
x

A7 (with a 9 added for fun):

x
12 (9)
12 (b7)
11 (3)
x
x

So just by changing one note I go from Em to A7, which is a i-IV progression.

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

DUDE!  My man.  I knew you'd come through.  Unfortunately I'm away from a guitar right now (biz trip), but gimme a couple of days and I'll check it out.  In the meantime, thanks.

"Just because you've always done it that way doesn't mean it's not incredibly stupid." - Despair, Inc.

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

Word to your business trip.

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

BGD - would love to see all of your chords to "Use Me"! Sorry to go off topic...

" Old Guy is Rocking"
Simon & Patrick Pro Flamed Maple (mmm, nice...)
Norman ST68 acoustic

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

I just play Em7 to A7 but I use a few different voicings. I'm on a business trip but as soon as I get back I'll tab a few out for ya.

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

Word to your business trip.

smile

"Just because you've always done it that way doesn't mean it's not incredibly stupid." - Despair, Inc.

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

Here ya go Norm. Some Em7 voicings (with extensions):

12 (or 14 or 15)
12
12
12
x
12
----
7 (or 9)
8
7
9
7
x (or 0)

0 (or 2 or 3)
0
0
0
2 (or x)
0
---
3
3
4
x
x
x (or 0)
---
7 (or 9)
7
7
5
7
x

Some A7 voicings (with extensions):

First one is my favorite.
x
7
6
5
x
5
----
5 (or 7)
5
6
5
7
5
---
12 (or 14, or x)
12 (or 13 if x above)
12
11
12
x
---
I also play lots of portions of these chords, mostly 3rds and b7s, eg:
x
x
6
5
x
x

and

x
x
12
11
x
x

18 (edited by Baldguitardude 2013-06-18 14:44:55)

Re: Gsus4 - self-discovered tip

Forgot to mention my favorite voicings. I love playing this in and out of solos:

Em7
x
12
12
12
x
x
---
A7
x
12
12
11
x
x

These are both rootless voicings, meaning I'm not playing the root of the chord. I'm just playing the color tones and letting the bass handle the root. However the reason I love these voicings is that they fall right in the middle of the E dorian scale starting on the 12th fret:

12 14 15
12 14 15
12 14 (throw in a 15 here for some funky time)
11 12 14
12 14 (16)
12 14  15