1 (edited by Classical Guitar 2016-09-17 21:43:32)

Topic: Seagull Guitars

Do any of you own a Seagull Guitar? From what I have read they produced very high quality guitars and use some great woods. I only play classical guitars and I know most of our members primary play steel string.  Seagull is made in Canada.

Here is a link to their site: http://www.seagullguitars.com/en/products/guitars

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

2 (edited by Tenement Funster 2016-09-17 23:13:35)

Re: Seagull Guitars

A guy I jam with has a Seagull S6 which he likes, and I have a LaPatrie classical ... both of which are part of the Godin group of Canadian guitar companies, based in Quebec.

My classical is an all-solid-wood model ("Concert") which only cost $450 new ... not bad for an all solid guitar. (http://www.lapatrieguitars.com/guitarsconcert.html) With a nice warm tone and "familiar-feeling" in the hands ... I would heartily recommend them. The steel-stringed Seagull necks are a little wider (1.8" at the nut) than standard (1.65") so with you being a classical guitarist, they may feel better to you than the narrower necks used on most steel string acoustics.

The only thing I don't like about Seagulls is the shape of their headstock. It's a matter of personal esthetics, but they look under-sized and just plain "goofy" to me.

Re: Seagull Guitars

Tenement Funster you have a great classical guitar. I think Seagull designed the head to be unique and different from everyone else. The size does lean to finger picking for a steel string. If you look at their site there are some that do not have pick guards.

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

4 (edited by Tenement Funster 2016-09-19 10:22:18)

Re: Seagull Guitars

What you say about the neck width & finger-picking is spot on, CG. When I sold my Larrivee D03 last year to buy the Cordoba, my main reason was neck width. I have rather large thick hands and fingers, and a normal neck is just too hard to play without dampening the strings on either side of the one I'm fretting. I did add a pickguard right away, just to protect the top against the pick. Sounds like a "Captain Obvious" statement, now that I've typed it.

https://longchaps2.files.wordpress.com/2015/07/captain-obvious3.jpg

Re: Seagull Guitars

Tenement Funster wrote:

What you say about the neck width & finger-picking is spot on, CG. When I sold my Larrivee D03 last year to buy the Cordoba, my main reason was neck width. I have rather large thick hands and fingers, and a normal neck is just too hard to play without dampening the strings on either side of the one I'm fretting. I did add a pickguard right away, just to protect the top against the pick. Sounds like a "Captain Obvious" statement, now that I've typed it.

https://longchaps2.files.wordpress.com/2015/07/captain-obvious3.jpg

Thank you. The photo is great.

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

Re: Seagull Guitars

I've owned about a dozen Seagulls or their cousins (Art & Lutherie, Simon & Patrick, Norman) All are well-made and good-sounding instruments. Like all guitars, some sound better than others. It's hard to go wrong with a Seagull S-6. Interestingly the solid-top, laminate back/side models sound better to me than the all solid ones..in most cases.
dj

Re: Seagull Guitars

My Seagull 12 serves all my solo shows. Easiest I could find to play and also the best sounding, though the higher end guitars are probably better...

Re: Seagull Guitars

Must admit, I'm with TF - never liked the headstock, which has caused me to never play one ... (and I'm too happy with my Maton)

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Re: Seagull Guitars

Not sure how this old post got pulled up, but now that it is, I've played a few Seagulls.  I think the one that has stuck with me is the S6 - a cedar topped steel string guitar that's slightly wider than usual at the nut.  I very much liked the feel and sound of the guitar.  As for the headstock...eh.  If it sounds good, it is good. Put a sock puppet on the headstock and talk to it between songs if it bothers you that badly.

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Re: Seagull Guitars

Zurf wrote:

Put a sock puppet on the headstock and talk to it between songs if it bothers you that badly.

Great suggestion ... creepy but funny.

Re: Seagull Guitars

KevinRK wrote:

My Seagull 12 serves all my solo shows. Easiest I could find to play and also the best sounding, though the higher end guitars are probably better...


I tested this guitar in a shop. Loved it!  I'dd put it against my Classic Ovation, and it was actually easier to play.

“Find your own sound.  Dont be a second rateYngwie Malmsteen be a first rate you”

– George Lynch 2013 (Dokken, Lynchmob, KXM, Tooth & Nail etc....)

Re: Seagull Guitars

neophytte wrote:

Must admit, I'm with TF - never liked the headstock, which has caused me to never play one ... (and I'm too happy with my Maton)

Really?? I like the fact it is different and I think very elegant.  Then again I am a fan of the big bottle opener head stock on the old deans and the legacy models. LOLOL big_smile

“Find your own sound.  Dont be a second rateYngwie Malmsteen be a first rate you”

– George Lynch 2013 (Dokken, Lynchmob, KXM, Tooth & Nail etc....)