Topic: Chord notation at Chordie

I would like to know what a "o" denotes at the end of the chord, ie: Bb"o", or C"o". (quotation marks mine) Also I'm a bit confused with a slash, typically referring to the base note which follows being followed instead by a number, ie; G#m7/5b. Lastly, your song chord notations use both # and b, as well as +. I typically understand a + to be a # and conversely a - to be a flat. How are you using + and - ?

Re: Chord notation at Chordie

hello Richard the "o" you refer to means a diminished chord eg; Bbdiminished.  the G#m7/5 means you add the 7th of the chord and the 5th of the chord. as for + that means an augmented chord. you can find most of these chords and shapes in the resources tab . enjoy chordie

Ask not what Chordie can do for you, but what you can do for Chordie.

Re: Chord notation at Chordie

Thanks Phill. I do know and use the chords, just wasn't familiar with the way you use the slash, and the o. Hadn't seen it before.

Re: Chord notation at Chordie

That shows me that there is something to learn every day !!  All this time I was of the impression that "o" meant "natural" and was omitted for brevity.... + for Augmented, - for Diminished, I still don't know what annotation is used for Dominant other than dom... but there must be something (?).  Also shows me that my lack of formal education musically left "gaps" that will eventually be filled by more "learned" folks.  Thanks for filling another Phill !!  smile

"what is this quintessence of dust?"  - Shakespeare

Re: Chord notation at Chordie

In popular music a 7 chord is assumed to be dominant. Natural 7ths will be indicated with “maj” or with a triangle before the 7.

Re: Chord notation at Chordie

Hi guys. There is a symbol for natural which is similar to sharp but I don't seem to have it on my tablet keypad.

The only formal musical education I have is from books when I was taking baby steps as far as playing is concerned.

I'm getting back into playing now and my fingers are aching and sore. I must grin and bear it, again as we all must if we want to play.

Ask not what Chordie can do for you, but what you can do for Chordie.

Re: Chord notation at Chordie

This is the natural note symbol:
http://static.memrise.com/uploads/mems/output/6311155-140914164042.png

Roger

8 (edited by Tenement Funster 2017-09-25 20:56:13)

Re: Chord notation at Chordie

When some of you can translate most of the above into common vernacular, I'll be grateful. I only speak two languages: English & Hillbilly. lol In all seriousness, my intermittent forays into learning music theory and notation haven't been consistent enough to go very far. The levels of expertise and knowledge here shows me something new all the time ... thanks!