Re: Some times it is how you play

When I finally left "the road" and laid down my sticks (but not the kit, I would still play my drums now and then), I started learning guitar. "Easier to carry", I said to myself, "and I can play for myself and take the occasional "replacement gig" with a band that needs a sit-in".

The learning took a long time with many months in between practices, but then I got into  it a little more, practiced on my 64 Kay (I didn't know about setting the bridge and I swear one had to be Hercules to push those strings down!

One day, I saw a Gretsch "White Falcon" and fell in love. Showed it to my dad, also a musician, who had this to say when I showed him the catalogue: "You buy that one,  son, you'd better sure know how to play it."

Made sense to me, so I "upgraded" to a Harmony.

I believe I may have told this story before, Classical Guitar, but I agree: If ol' Willie can get the sounds out of that banged-up guitar he plays, it sure shouldn't matter what brand I play or how cheap it is, am I good enough to make it sound like I know what I am doing?

Great question my friend!

Bill

Epiphone Les Paul Studio
Fender GDO300 Orchestral - a gift from Amy & Jim
Rogue Beatle Bass
Pearl Drums

Re: Some times it is how you play

My first one was a Classical and paid very little for it although it was good quality (almost a gift from a surgeon), and like Zurf passed it on to my Sister.  The second one I still have... a 12 string Dreadnought of generic Japanese manufacture from the 70s.  Then Bill mentioned Kay.... yup I had one of those in a 12 also, and it was a fine sounding albeit not-expensive instrument, which also passed to my Sister and I wish I still had that one as it had a "trapeze" and light bracing which contributed to the "amazing" tone and resonance beyond it's price point.  Then I added an Epiphone ST175 which I still have and a Fender amp (tube) which now has a "blown speaker" and I keep for "sentimental reasons".... I got those two as a "set" and the duo preserved my sanity during my Vietnam "vacation".

A couple of others "came & went" of no particular significance mostly bought cheap and gifted to others.... then I got an Ovation and have used the heck out of it and still do, Daily.

I view the guitar as a tool,  an instrument through which one conveys something you already possess or have acquired through talent, practice and education.  Just as a more expensive wrench does not make one a better mechanic, it might make the job easier.  So too a "better Guitar" does not make you a better player.... which I guess is why a good Guitarist can make music on just about anything with frets and strings, and I don't depend on my music to "make a living".  wink

"what is this quintessence of dust?"  - Shakespeare

Re: Some times it is how you play

Bill and Doug_Smith my first classical guitar cost the least of any Yamaha at the time and I played mostly folk music on it. I was self–taught and was using my thumb and two fingers. I and two others practiced singing and played at local restaurants on week ends. After that I got serious and took serious lessons from very good teacher that lived an hour from where I lived. I worked hard and learned the "right way" to play. I was told then I had a very good ear and within a few months I was playing Moonlight Sonata and some others. At my first recital my teacher told me he could not teach me more and another teacher heard my recital and offered to teach me  and I took lessons from him for another year. I went to college for 6 years and still played and practiced. I worked my up in a local industry to senior vp and on weekends I stated to do some concerts.I  was lucky enough to retire early and took my playing and doing concerts to another level and also started teaching others too.  Although both teachers wanted me to look at my fingers when I played I never did and and I teach my students to play and I still teach them correctly and not to look at their guitar either. If you feel what you play  and all classical guitars are the same size you don't have to watch yourself to play.

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

Re: Some times it is how you play

Ahhh! Finally someone to post with! I hope y'all know how important you are to me and I can see we have some very talented guitarists with us. Doug sent me a "snippet" of a tune he played, but I am always anxious to hear more, so as soon as "Mr. Bad Luck" leaves town, I'll be back for some more listening/critiquing.

Happy Sunday, wherever you are and we send our love as always.

Bill and Dondra Craig

Epiphone Les Paul Studio
Fender GDO300 Orchestral - a gift from Amy & Jim
Rogue Beatle Bass
Pearl Drums