Topic: A Few Years Back......

....... an old high school friend of mine invited me over to his house to jam a little on our acoustics. After a few tunes, I got frustrated, we drank a beer, talked some music and then I left.

See, it wasn't because he was left-handed or that he refused to buy a left-handed guitar. It was because he re-strung the guitar and then played it left-handed. I wish i'd had some sheet music in front of me, because in addition to not calling out the chord changes he kept yelling, "Don't try to follow me, Bill!" Meaning don't watch his finger positions.

After about an hour of this, I thought to myself, "Yeah, don't try to follow me out the door, Gary."

Please don't take this as a criticism of left handed players, but some sheet music sure would have helped.

Opinions?

Epiphone Les Paul Studio
Fender GDO300 Orchestral - a gift from Amy & Jim
Rogue Beatle Bass

Re: A Few Years Back......

Great story, Bill ... quite an adventure. Sheet music would have done me no good, 'cuz I can't read it. As long as his guitar had fret markers, that would be how I'd try to stay with him. Imagine trying to keep up with Lee Pomeroy. He plays left-handed, but leaves the guitar strung conventionally, i.e., all of his chord shapes and scale patterns are upside down!

http://www.dprp.net/concrev/2013_hackett_2/hackett3.jpg

ACOUSTICS:  Cordoba D10-CE / LaPatrie "Concert" / Takamine GD30CE-12 / Norman ST30
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Re: A Few Years Back......

Russel Hitchcock from Air Supply does the same I was fascinated watching his playing when I was learning 'All Out Of Love'.

Getting back to Bill's point, I have jammed with lefties before and have had no problem watching and following them. When you know the key, you know the common chords used and watching a lefty is like looking in a mirror at yourself playing (the way I learnt to play chords without getting into weird positions to see where my fingers were lol). However having the music does make things a whole lot easier.

Roger

Re: A Few Years Back......

as i play lefty i have no problems following righties as rog says "it's like looking in the mirror" which is what lennon did when he and mccartney got together. i guess chord sheets would help a great deal?

Ask not what Chordie can do for you, but what you can do for Chordie.

Re: A Few Years Back......

I totally agree with all above !!  A good friend whom I have played with for many years is a "lefty"..... and as long as we both know the tune and the chords, all is well.  Until I try to introduce a new piece and then it does get trying.  Not because he can't follow me, but because he will ask what chord is that?  Jeff is self taught and never took the time to learn the common names of chords, so if I toss in a Maj7b5 or anything in the 6 or 9 group, one has to stop and "teach" the new shape before going on (and hoping it "sticks").  Which is too bad because we do like to wander out in the blues/jazz zone once in awhile.  This year we do have to work on scales and modes.  smile

That is the great thing about taking up guitar, it is a lifelong "learning experience".  big_smile

"what is this quintessence of dust?"  - Shakespeare

Re: A Few Years Back......

I have taught two lefties. One did not pass reading music. The other became a very good player.,and he bought very good left hand classical guitar. Playing from music is universal so at some point the hand they play does not matter.  I think it is harder if you are teaching chords to change thinking.

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

7 (edited by Strummerboy Bill 2018-05-06 23:37:17)

Re: A Few Years Back......

As I stated before, it's hard to come here and NOT learn something. smile Roger, do you mean that if the guy says "Okay, Proud Mary in E", I should automatically know the chord progression?  With my age and memory problems that might be a challenge, but I'm up for it. Is it the same for bass,?

That guy in the picture above, Rick,  looks like he's not chording with his hand. That thing looks like half a spider.

Thanks for all the replies. Still hanging in there and trying to exercise a little even though my energy flags a lot of the time.

Bill

Epiphone Les Paul Studio
Fender GDO300 Orchestral - a gift from Amy & Jim
Rogue Beatle Bass

Re: A Few Years Back......

Strummerboy Bill wrote:

As I stated before, it's hard to come here and NOT learn something. smile Roger, do you mean that if the guy says "Okay, Proud Mary in E", I should automatically know the chord progression? 
Bill

Bill, no the chord progression you would not know, but the chords likely to be used you should know; and experience, along with your musical ear, would give you a good idea as to which to use.

In the key of E. the major chords are E, A and B (often a 7th); the relative minor chord is C#m and secondary minor chords are F#m and G#m (which are the relative minor chords for A and B respectively). OK, occasionally some songs will have other chords thrown in but these will be the exception.

Here is a chart I give all my students to guide them:

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/824/40139605020_992ccb0f9a_b.jpg

Roger

Re: A Few Years Back......

That's a good chart, Roger. I always think of the Steppenwolf song "Magic Carpet Ride" where the main riff is that 3-note structure in G (starting at D > C > G). I picked one of these Hal Leonard "Chord Wheel" doo-hickies a few years back, and it's also very helpful.

http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0112/7482/products/Chord_Wheel_3_of_6_grande.jpg?v=1512692099

ACOUSTICS:  Cordoba D10-CE / LaPatrie "Concert" / Takamine GD30CE-12 / Norman ST30
ELECTRICS:  EP Les Paul Custom Pro / Gretsch Streamliner G2420T / EP Thunderbird Pro IV bass
AMPS:  Traynor YCS50 / Peavey VK212 / Traynor AM150T / Fender Rumble 150
EFFECTS: Boss ME-80 Multi-effects / Ibanez WD7 wah

Re: A Few Years Back......

Thanks, both of you for that chart. You know what scares me? That word "pentatonic". It makes me think of those monks in "Monty Python and The Holy Grail" who walk around in a circle and slap themselves upside the head when they quit the chant.

I'm the kind of guy who remembers his dreams and writes them down (like my songs/poems) and a dreamed about a guy who asked me to play a pentatonic scale, and I told him "Why don't you take a flyin' leap into a rollin' donut?" and walked out.

Just a little "aside" there, but there ARE lessons out there which do scare me a little. That Mel Bay one, for instance, and there's a guy on YouTube who teaches how to play "Real Bass". They're both great methods I'm sure, but I haven't opened that Mel Bay since I bought it 30 years ago, and the guy on YT? God bless him, but if he were Andres Segovia, I don't think I could get past his front door. smile

Thanks again, Roger and TF

Bill

Epiphone Les Paul Studio
Fender GDO300 Orchestral - a gift from Amy & Jim
Rogue Beatle Bass

Re: A Few Years Back......

I hadn't seen those monks for a while, Bill, so looked them up:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgYEuJ5u1K0

The guy in the rear is carrying a tattered burlap banner, and it has nothing on it at all. lol

ACOUSTICS:  Cordoba D10-CE / LaPatrie "Concert" / Takamine GD30CE-12 / Norman ST30
ELECTRICS:  EP Les Paul Custom Pro / Gretsch Streamliner G2420T / EP Thunderbird Pro IV bass
AMPS:  Traynor YCS50 / Peavey VK212 / Traynor AM150T / Fender Rumble 150
EFFECTS: Boss ME-80 Multi-effects / Ibanez WD7 wah

Re: A Few Years Back......

Love those monks .

Re: A Few Years Back......

I learned the "Mel Bay Way", for some chord shapes it makes sense to have an "anchor" string that you slide on to index the more common chord changes, and I still use the Mel Bay fingering pattern for A (in the first position).  That "crossed finger" does throw off others that might be trying to follow along, but it works.  He also had a whole slew of unusual fingerings for more complex chord voicings that required more joints in the fingers than I was built with.  smile  Then you look at Django who had 2 1/2 fingers at best ...... so why am I complaining ?  Just takes more practice !!  big_smile

"what is this quintessence of dust?"  - Shakespeare

Re: A Few Years Back......

Doug, you crack me up..."more fingers than i was born with" lol lol

Ask not what Chordie can do for you, but what you can do for Chordie.