Topic: As long as we're on the topic of frets...

The fret closest to the bridge catches my high e string on Tiny.  I've put 10's on him to get a jangly sound and allow a lower action - all of which is great. But now the high e string catches under the bottom fret sometimes when I'm playing. 

I've tried tapping the fret down gently. I do not play that far up, so the fret is superfluous. I'm thinking of just popping it out. Are there any other suggestions?

Granted B chord amnesty by King of the Mutants (Long live the king).
If it comes from the heart and you add a few beers... it'll be awesome! - Mekidsmom
When in doubt ... hats. - B.G. Dude

Re: As long as we're on the topic of frets...

You could try raising the bridge slightly, or a shim under the string riser ( I don't know the correct term) I wouldn't take the last fret away, maybe try filing it?

Ask not what Chordie can do for you, but what you can do for Chordie.

Re: As long as we're on the topic of frets...

I'm with Phill on this one, if it is up there at something like fret 22 or 24 (where most of us never wander in acoustic-land) I would think that dressing the end that catches with a small file would solve that problem.  But then again with the light gauge strings you are using, a bit of a shim under the bridge would also be a good alternative as your setup may be a bit low for the lower string tension of the lighter strings.  Are you really aggressive with a pick?  Because there should be a good bit of fret wire beyond the string (outside) or I would wonder if the bridge was set off-center.  Most of mine have 3/16-1/4 inch before the end bevel (including #23) and I would think it darn hard to "bend" the string far enough to hang up under normal strumming or picking.

I'm curious....

"what is this quintessence of dust?"  - Shakespeare

Re: As long as we're on the topic of frets...

Shim the bridge.

Re: As long as we're on the topic of frets...

Zurfl, if you have reduced your strings to 10's you will have reduced the string tension and the neck is likely to have arched back slightly. Look along it (or preferably use a long straight edge) to check it is true. My guess is that slight back arch is the problem and a slight release of the truss rod tension will do the trick.

The other thing is there may be a spur on the outside edge of the fret which need filing off.

I have had this happen a time or two myself.

Roger

"Do, or do not; there is no try"

Re: As long as we're on the topic of frets...

All of these suggestions have to do with increasing the action. That's against the point of using lighter gauge strings in the first place.

I'll pick up a fine file and try filing the fret.  If that doesn't work, then I'll pop it out file the fret and tap it back in.  I'm not interested in raising action if it can be at all helped.

I've already gone through the cycles of truss rod adjustment and letting the guitar settle into the new tension.

Yes, I'm agressive with the pick. I'm using this guitar as a strummer and for learning new partial barre chord shapes, so there's a lot of banging out rhythm parts involved with that.

Granted B chord amnesty by King of the Mutants (Long live the king).
If it comes from the heart and you add a few beers... it'll be awesome! - Mekidsmom
When in doubt ... hats. - B.G. Dude

Re: As long as we're on the topic of frets...

Sounds like your fret board has shrunk a bit, if there's a fret coming unseated and/or protruding from the edge. A bit of dressing (filing) should be a quick answer. Can you get a clamp on top of it and under the neck, or is it too far up? An overnight clamping will often re-seat a fret, where tapping won't.

Long term, you may need a humidifier in your guitar room.

Re: As long as we're on the topic of frets...

If you're going to file it, be sure to get one of these (or make something equivilent:

http://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/To … uards.html

I've filed a few fret without this, but if you nick the wood, it's not a nice outcome ... a couple of slivers of aluminum or thin steel will also do the trick, with a thick lacky band to hold it in place (because I can't afford StewMac prices!!) ...

Cheers

Richard

-[ Musician, writer, guitarist, poor singer ]-
My songs             http://neophytte.mine.nu/audio/
My Soundcloud   https://soundcloud.com/neophytte1
My YouTube         https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHnDpTAPTUE&list=PLhpGn51pPqN6q8kmuORnuWcAXRF1_b1zV

9 (edited by Classical Guitar 2017-12-22 09:10:54)

Re: As long as we're on the topic of frets...

For most guitar work and frets included either use a good   Luthier or an experienced guitar tech. Just because you can find the the products does not mean most guitar owners would have the same experience doing their work. Guitars of any type are  expensive . Why do frets and tech work without using an expert? I

Music is what feelings sound like.
Music is life, that why our hearts have beats.

Re: As long as we're on the topic of frets...

Classical Guitar wrote:

For most guitar work and frets included either use a good   Luthier or an experienced guitar tech. Just because you can find the the products does not mean most guitar owners would have the same experience doing their work. Guitars of any type are  expensive . Why do frets and tech work without using an expert? I

Different people are at different levels of DIY ... you have a valid point, but depends on the value of the guitar to the owner ... and experience, and willingness to expand experience ...

-[ Musician, writer, guitarist, poor singer ]-
My songs             http://neophytte.mine.nu/audio/
My Soundcloud   https://soundcloud.com/neophytte1
My YouTube         https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHnDpTAPTUE&list=PLhpGn51pPqN6q8kmuORnuWcAXRF1_b1zV